Co-sponsored by


Tuesday, 19 November 2019

New thinking.
Game changing.
Future making.


Stream 1. The Food Revolution: feeding 10 billion people sustainably

The Future of Food - transforming the Global Food System

09.30 – 13.00

It is universally acknowledged that the global food system is broken, leaving billions of people either underfed or overweight and driving the planet towards climate catastrophe. This session highlights an upsurge in new thinking and identifies the game changing developments in practices and technology which will transform the system. How should the global food system function?

Moderated by:

09.30 – 10.00

Summit spotlight: Will feeding the world kill the planet?
We have a quandary with the growing population and the rise of the middle classes in the next 30 years versus the finite resources of the planet. How do we feed these people sustainably and equitably? Will new food technologies be able to help us and if so what are these key technologies? Equally important is whether society will grant these technologies a social licence.

10.00 – 10.30

Summit spotlight: Sustainable and healthy food systems

Food systems are under pressure to deliver both sufficient but also the right diets to growing and rapidly urbanising global populations. Increasing evidence demonstrates that shifting national diets towards consensual national dietary guidelines is associated with benefits for both population health and the environment. Simultaneously, projected future environmental change is likely to significantly alter the yield of many important food crops. These changes are likely to reduce the availability of crops in both food-exporting and food-importing nations with potential impacts on population health. Understanding the link between agriculture and health, and the impact of environmental change is essential for generating solutions that can ensure future global health.

10.30 – 11.00 

Refreshments

11.00 – 12.00

Panel debate: how should the global food system function?

 

12.15 – 13.00 

SummitConnect: 1-2-1 meeting sessions in Platinum Suite 3 and 4

13.00 – 14.00 

Summit networking lunch


Stream 2. Tomorrow’s innovation: defining the future of nutrition and food systems

Changing global diets: innovation for health and nutrition

09.30 – 13.00

The global food industry has an enormous opportunity to improve poor diets, and whilst lead times, the cost of investment in innovation and the risks associated with product development are high, the need for change is only accelerating. This session reveals why innovation is the key to changing global diets for the better.

Moderated by: 

09.30 – 10.00

Summit spotlight

10.00 – 10.30

Summit spotlight: Innovation at the heart of a National Food Strategy

Earlier this year, the UK government appointed Henry Dimbleby to conduct a year-long review of England’s food system. Based on the outcome and recommendations, the government will then publish an ambitious, multi-disciplinary National Food Strategy, the first of its kind for 75 years. For the first time in a generation, the National Food Strategy will break down the silos to take a whole system approach. The current challenges the UK faces require a broader perspective than the traditional vertical food supply chain alone. The review will take into account the interconnections between health, environment, agriculture, education and the economy in an integrated way and as we shape what we want our food system of the future to look like, innovation must be at the heart of it.

In this session, Henry will detail some of the innovations that could change our food system for the better and seek the views and insights of delegates to feed into his evidence gathering process.

10.30 – 11.00

Refreshments

11.00 – 12.00

Panel debate: utilising innovation and technology to change global diets

12.15 – 13.00

SummitConnect: 1-2-1 meeting sessions in Platinum Suite 3 and 4

13.00 – 14.00

Summit networking lunch


Stream 3. Feeding the future: how disruption is changing the food industry

Disrupting the business of food

09.30 – 13.00

Disruption is becoming a feature of the food industry, and it is clear that the pace of change is accelerating, driven by technology, internet and social media, changing behaviours and expectations. Numerous entrants to the market provide both a threat and an opportunity for the established food industry. Technology is the key facilitator, but equally as important, they provide energy, new ideas, flexibility, immediacy and relevance. So how can these new exciting new companies be encouraged further, and how can their impact be accelerated for the benefit of the food system?

Moderated by: 

09.30 – 10.00

Summit spotlight: Decoding the future of food robotics - how our relationship with food will be transformed through robots
They began in the factories, as part of the industrial revolution. Now we have them as co-workers, surgeons, as pets, serving in hotels, building houses, as security guards, picking fruits in the fields, etc ... Now, in combination with artificial intelligence, the robots are going to transform the food itself. Kitchen robots, robot-driving cooking, ChefBots, robot farms, warehouse robots, barista robots, edible robots, this is only the beginning of what The Next Big Thing will be. Welcome to the Food Robolution!

10.00 – 10.30

Summit spotlight: Seeds of disruption - how food technology will save the planet
As populations and incomes rise throughout the world, more and more environmental scientists and economists are asking how the world will support its projected population of 9.5 billion people by 2050 and how governments can meet the climate change goals they committed to in the Paris Agreement. Venture capital firms, entrepreneurs, and major corporations are rising to the challenge, innovating and marketing plant and cultured alternatives to meat, dairy, and eggs that are cleaner, safer, and more sustainable. Here, Bruce Friedrich discusses why animal protein alternatives are gaining popularity with the biggest tech investors in Silicon Valley, including Bill Gates, Biz Stone, and Sergey Brin, how cultivated meat grown in a brewery will change how the world eats and why the future of protein is directly linked to the future of the planet itself.

10.30 – 11.00

Refreshments

11.00 – 12.00

Panel debate: accelerating innovation and disruption to secure the future of food

12.15 – 13.00

SummitConnect: 1-2-1 meetings in Platinum Suite 3 and 4

13.00 – 14.00

Summit networking lunch


Stream 1. The Food Revolution: feeding 10 billion people sustainably

How can science save us?

14.00 – 17.30

Today’s food system is already challenged on many fronts, and faces the enormous task of feeding nearly 10 billion people by 2050. So how will we do this? Part of the answer lies in harnessing the capabilities of digital and technological innovation including artificial intelligence, robotics and ‘big data’, to create a new wave of practices for food production and supply chain management. This session will explore what the next food and agricultural revolution will look like, and how science will enable it to happen.

Moderated by:

14.00 – 15.00 

Panel debate: how can science save us?

 

15.00 – 15.30

Refreshments

15.30 – 16.00

Summit spotlight: Sustainable intensification of horticultural production

Horticulture is often highly productive and increasingly uses cutting edge technology to find new and innovative ways of extending cropping seasons. As a result, high value crop production is often energy intensive, requiring high levels of both direct and indirect energy, especially in our cooler northern climate.

Through the use of new genetics tools, designing higher yielding plants is possible and has the potential to make environmentally sustainable yield gains. Improved tools and analyses such as Life cycle assessment (LCA) are urgently needed to quantify externalities of production and provide evidence for where research efforts and potential interventions should be directed. In a new policy landscape there could be further, evidence based, direct incentives to lower fossil fuel energy and transfer to renewable energy usage through a “produce or reduce” incentivisation scheme, as used in other areas of the world.

It is clear that all of us, as consumers are responsible for our current food system, but we are either largely unaware of our actions, or are unable to act, either due to cost, or lack of information about alternative choices. Technology could help raise awareness and shift consumer behaviour, but it is more likely that a greater joining up of policy is needed to ensure that the many unintended consequences of our current interconnected food and infrastructure network are mitigated. This requires coordinated action from the whole food chain, otherwise it is highly likely that as a nation we will miss our targets for decarbonisation and climate change mitigation in the agri-food sector despite the clear potential to sustainably intensify.

16.00 – 16.30

Summit spotlight: plant science

16.45 – 17.30

SummitConnect: 1-2-1 meeting sessions in Platinum Suite 3 and 4

17.30 – 18.00

Summit drinks reception


Stream 2. Tomorrow’s innovation: defining the future of nutrition and food systems

Next generation food manufacturing and supply chain

14.00 – 17.30

In a world where customer tastes and trends change rapidly, food manufacturers need to embrace technology. But what does that really mean? This session anticipates the ways in which food manufacturing will be revolutionised by the impact of technology - robotics, artificial intelligence, big data, nanotechnology, blockchain, intelligent supply chain management, and of course, the Internet of Things.

Moderated by:

14.00 – 14.30 

Summit spotlight: Agricultural robots can help feed the planet

As the world’s population grows beyond agricultural sustainability, we need to look again at how we grow food. Genetics have offered promises that have not yet been realised. But there is a weak link in the current production system that has remained unchanged for 80 years that forces farmers into a single type of unsustainable management, and that is the nature of the machines we use to grow our crops.

The agricultural robot system we are developing offers the chance to reduce the cost of production while having a reduced effect on the environment through ‘intelligently targeted inputs’. This session will explore how this type of efficiency benefits both the economics of food production and improves sustainability and how in years to come we will wonder at our current crude methods of farming by averages.

14.30 – 15.00

Summit spotlight: Accelerating change through digital business transformation

According to technology analysts Forrester, there are three levels of maturity when it comes to digitalisation.

First, software is helping manufacturers to reduce operational costs through automation. The next step is where manufacturers optimize their operations with predictive analytics. And finally, where they transcend technology to disrupt traditional business models with new ‘as-a-service’ offerings.

In this session, Kim Matenchuk from GE Digital, will introduce Dr. Christian Grefrath from food and beverage packaging company SIG Combibloc. Christian will outline how SIG are now using GE Digital’s software to achieve all three levels of digital maturity – from automation, to predictive analytics and even business transformation – to provide food manufacturers ‘packaging as a service’ as part of their new Plant 360 Asset Management offering. He will outline how SIG is executing against its strategic vision to use new digital technologies as part of a strategic drive to improve its offering to customers in both established and developing markets.

15.00 – 15.30

Refreshments

15.30 – 16.30 

Panel debate: is the food industry innovating fast enough?

 

 

16.45 – 17.30

SummitConnect: 1-2-1 meeting sessions in Platinum Suite 3 and 4

17.30 – 18.00

Summit drinks reception


Stream 3. Feeding the future: how disruption is changing the food industry

Meet the game changers

14.00 – 17.30

This session celebrates the innovators and disruptors making a difference to the food sector. Covering a range of activities, such as innovative proteins, waste reduction solutions, smart kitchen technology, sustainable packaging, food delivery, subscription kits, and many more. Some are still embryonic, but all reflect a rethinking of every aspect of the way we source, produce, package, distribute, promote, buy and consume.

Moderated by: 

14.00 – 15.00

Panel debate: meet the game changers

This session will bring together some of today’s most exciting food tech disruptors to talk about their motivations and aspirations as they seek to transform the global food system and play their part in securing a sustainable future. Game changers who have already confirmed include:



15.00 – 15.30

Refreshments

15.30 – 16.30

Start-up pitch session

This is an opportunity for food-tech start-ups to take to the floor to present their solutions and receive expert feedback from the investor pitch panel. Each start-up will have 3 minutes to pitch plus 3 minutes of feedback and questions from the panel.

Selection will be via an application process for registered start-ups. For more information contact Louise.bridges@foodtechmattters.com before Friday 1 November.  

Investor judging panel:
Led by Ivan Farneti, Co-Founder, Five Seasons Ventures (France)
Gil Horsky, Director of Innovation SnackFutures, Mondelez International (Israel)
Jewell Sparks, Founder and CEO, BiTHOUSE Group (Germany)
Nadav Berger, Founder and Managing Partner, PeakBridge Partners (Israel)

16.45 – 17.30

SummitConnect: 1-2-1 meeting sessions in Platinum Suite 3 and 4

17.30 – 18.00

Summit reception drinks